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IPv6 connection

Level 1a

We would like to use IPv6 on the Xbox one.  We checked the router which advises the IPv6 status as connecting but never actually connects.  Could someone please advise - in the most simplistic way - on how to connect/action/request this to be done.

8 REPLIES 8
Moderator

Hi @Alissa,

 

Welcome to TPG Community!

 

We currently don't have an IPv6 connection.

 

Currently, IPv4 is the only available with our service.

 

Kind regards,

BasilDV

Level 1a

That's not good enough TPG.
You are behind the times.

APNIC allocated its last IPv4 block back in 2011. You may have a pool of addresses, but not everyone enjoys being behind a NAT and having a dynamic IP. As an ISP it is your responsibility to prepare for the IPv6 migration. It has been nearly 8 years. C'mon guys, you knew this was coming and yet you wait and see and NAT. NAT NAT NAT...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4_address_exhaustion

Level 1

Agreed. I noticed TPG are giving us an IPv6 address for the past few months now, but I'm not sure if it's static (one hopes so, but it wouldn't surprise me, sadly, if in order to protect product differentiation - i.e. the ability to charge more for static IPs) they declined such a gurantee (wicked and evil as that would be). On my list of todos is to update my IP change monitor to log Ipv6 WAN addresses. In the mean time it would be nice if TPG could confirm whether the IPv6 addresses they now DO provide, are static (as they should perforce be!).

Interestingly my interest in a static IP is not to do away with NAT (which has immense value aside by isolatig the LAN through a single firewall that I can selectively let traffic through on to specific LAN devices) but because I use remote access to home services a lot and for that need to manage DDNS updates and suffer the general issues of IP pool reputability when it comes to some things (like my mail server sending emails to gmail addresses).

Level 1c

Since more users have moved to NBN, which provides a uplink speed like 20 times faster than ADSL2+, IPv6 is more needed for hosting something at home. Port mapping on the router is obsolate, hard to maintain and brings safety issues.

Level 1b

I hear Aussie Broadband is trialing IPv6 support, with no lock in contract. I've called TPG and the techs haven't heard anything about adding IPv6 so I wouldn't get your homes up. Since my contract with TPG is up I'll be trying them out. Thanks TPG the last 7 years has been great XD

Level 8

@ShadowsNight IPv6 offers no compelling advantage over IPv4, in fact can actually be slower in IPv6 only situations, just because things have a higher number or a longer acronym doesn't mean they're any better, the day your RSP can't provide you with any IP is the day you need to be concerned.

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Level 1b

My partner and I like to play games on the train using our computers at home, but with IPv4 we can only assign one computer on the network over the internet natively so we need to take turns. We're also forced to use her computer at the moment because she uses it for uni transferring media files remotely. With IPv6 we'll both be able to access our computers at the same time and play multi-player games together. Yes the need for IPv6 is niche but it is still something people will be looking for.

Level 1a

@orbistat please cite your source for IPv6 being slower than IPv4.